Hamilton Center, Inc. Focuses on Veterans Issues for Suicide Prevention Month

22 Push up Challenge Brings Message Home

In 2016, it was reported that 22 veterans and service members were dying by suicide every day in the US.

Three years later, a 2018 report shows that number is now at 20.6.

For Bill Little, LCSW, local veteran and Program Coordinator of the Military Veteran Program (MVP) at Hamilton Center, Inc., “one is too many; zero is the goal.”

On Monday September 30, 2019, coinciding with Suicide Prevention Awareness Month, Little hosted the culmination to the 22 Push-up Facebook Challenge, in recognition of the 22 veterans and services members that complete suicide every day in the US.

For 22 days in September local groups and organizations took part in the challenge by completing 22 push-ups and challenging others to do the same. The purpose of the campaign was to not only to use local businesses and organizations to bring awareness to suicide prevention but to target conversation around the specific issues that veterans and service members face.

“We know that veterans and service members are more likely to experience trauma related disorders, struggle with reintegration into their communities, and isolate themselves from others due to overwhelming fear of stigma,” said Bill Little. “All of these factors and more lead to a higher risk of suicidal ideations, suicide attempts, and suicide completion,” he added.

With over 7,500 veterans, and over 45,000 US adults dying by suicide every year, its evident this issue is affecting everyone in some way. It is estimated that for every suicide there are 135 individuals affected by the event, often leading to trauma and trauma related disorders. For veterans it can be said that this contributes to a vicious cycle of trauma, isolation, and suicidal ideations. Whatever the circumstances of one’s struggle, Melvin L Burks, CEO of Hamilton Center, Inc. has a straight forward message, “Your life has great value; you are not alone; recovery is possible.”

If you or a loved one are struggling with trauma related issues, thoughts of suicide, or experiencing a crisis, Hamilton Center, Inc. can help. For more information on MVP and other services call 1-800-742-0787 for crisis support.

Hamilton Center also offers community mental health trainings including Mental Health First Aid, Youth Mental Health First Aid, Question, Persuade, and Refer (QPR), and Trauma-informed Care (TIC). Each of these courses offer individuals, groups, and organizations certified skills and tools that can assist them in helping someone that might be experiencing a crisis or suicidal ideations. To learn more about these courses go to www.trianingourcommunity.org.

Hamilton Center, Inc. is a private, not-for-profit regional health system in central and west central Indiana. The Organization is building hop and changing lives through a broad array of health service for people during their entire lifecycle, birth through older adulthood. Services are individualized, trauma informed, and evidence based.

For more information contact 812-231-8323 or visit www.hamiltoncenter.org.

Hamilton Center Expands Vigo County Addictions Services

Now Certified in Gambling Addictions through DMHA

Hamilton Center, Inc. is pleased to announce its State certification through the Division of Mental Health and Addiction (DMHA) to provide problem gambling services. These services will be offered by designated providers through two programs – Vigo County Outpatient, located at 620 8th Ave. in Terre Haute, IN, and Vigo County Addictions, located at 66 Wabash Court, in Terre Haute, IN.

While this certification is specific to Vigo County, the organization continues to provide counseling for gambling addiction, and all other forms of addiction, throughout its 10-county regional footprint.

Gambling services in the Vigo County programs will be reimbursed by DMHA, should the consumer have no insurance coverage. This would include those without any insurance coverage at all or those whose plans do not include gambling addiction or services offered by DMHA. The DMHA covered services include individual counseling, case management, skills training, financial counseling, transportation and other support services.

DMHA identifies problem gambling as gambling behavior which causes disruptions in any major area of life: psychological, physical, social or vocational. The term “problem gambling” includes, but is not limited to, the condition known as pathological, or “compulsive” gambling, a progressive addiction characterized by increasing preoccupation with gambling, a need to bet more money more frequently, restlessness or irritability when attempting to stop, “chasing” losses, and loss of control manifested by continuation of the gambling behavior in spite of mounting, serious, negative consequences.

Hamilton Center, Inc. is a private, not-for-profit regional health system in central and west central Indiana. The Organization is building hop and changing lives through a broad array of health service for people during their entire lifecycle, birth through older adulthood. Services are individualized, trauma informed, and evidence based.

For more information contact 812-231-8323 or visit www.hamiltoncenter.org.

Hamilton Center Welcomes New Therapists to Indy Office

Hamilton Center, Inc. welcomes therapist James Davis, MA, and Mary Jones, MA to the Indianapolis satellite office located 2160 N. Illinois St. in Indianapolis, IN.

Mr. Davis graduated with a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Southern Indiana and later went on to complete a master’s in mental health counselling in 2014. Mr. Davis has experience as a school based therapist where he led skills groups, family therapy, and completed crisis assessments for children and adolescents. His clinical experiences include motivational interviewing, play therapy,, cognitive behavioral therapy, and other therapeutic techniques. In addition, his clinical interests are in Trauma Informed Care and Cognitive Behavioral theory and application.

Ms. Jones graduated with a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Indiana University and later completed a master’s degree in counseling at Northwestern University in 2018. Her clinical experiences include individual therapy, family therapy, crisis intervention, and skills training. In addition her clinical interests are recovery from trauma with people from all genders, personality disorders, and mood disorders.

Hamilton Center, Inc. is a regional behavioral health system in Central and West Central Indiana with corporate offices located in Terre Haute, IN. Services are provided to children, youth and adults, with specialized programs for expectant mothers, infants, and people who may be struggling with stress, life changes, or relationship issues as well as more serious problems such as depression, anxiety disorders, and serious mental illnesses.

For information on Hamilton Center Services call (800) 742-0787.

Hamilton Center Welcomes New Therapist to Owen County

Hamilton Center, Inc. welcomes therapist Nathan Saucedo, MSW, LCSW, to the Owen County satellite office located 909 W. Hillside Ave. in Spencer, IN.

Mr. Saucedo graduated with a bachelor’s degree in human services from Lindsey Wilson College and later went on to the University of Kentucky to complete a Master of Social Work degree. Mr. Saucedo has experienced his field from many perspectives including working with the Division of Mental Health and Substance Abuse in Kentucky, community mental health centers, inpatient treatment, and management and through private practice. Clinically he is certified in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and chemical dependency. His special interests are in LGBTQ populations and adults.

Hamilton Center, Inc. is a regional behavioral health system in Central and West Central Indiana with corporate offices located in Terre Haute, IN. Services are provided to children, youth and adults, with specialized programs for expectant mothers, infants, and people who may be struggling with stress, life changes, or relationship issues as well as more serious problems such as depression, anxiety disorders, and serious mental illnesses.

For information on Hamilton Center Services call (800) 742-0787.

Be The Change

Be the Change event invites guests to learn about the chemicals in our brains that affect happiness and the power of connection

On Thursday, Sept. 19, join Hamilton Center Foundation, Inc., for the fourth annual Be the Change event, where individuals will have the opportunity to learn about the chemicals in our brains that affect happiness and discover the power of connecting with one another – all while raising funds to help provide high-quality behavioral health care and wellness services in our community.

This year’s theme for Be the Change, “Getting Your Daily Dose & The Power of Community,” will feature Danielle Bryan, a Confidence Coach & Transformational Speaker based in Austin, Texas. Bryan is a Terre Haute native who has spent the past decade traveling around United States with a path rooted in the service of others and awakening the Inner Power of her clients.

Bryan’s passion for changing the way we view “Self Love” started at a young age when she saw much suffering in her family and felt her own negative self-talk affecting her daily life. Countless years of unworthiness and shame carried into her young adult life, and she could feel the need to create change.

Through her workshops and speaking engagements, Bryan strives to bring a sense of connection and love through the avenues of “Movement, Meditation & Motivation,” and her goal is to impact 17 million by changing the way people approach their mental and physical health. During Be the Change, she will share information about the four primary chemicals in our brains that affect happiness — dopamine, oxytocin, serotonin and endorphins — and the power of connecting with one another.

Be the Change: Getting Your Daily Dose & The Power of Community will take place on Thursday, Sept. 19, at the Red Barn at Sycamore Farm, 5001 Poplar Street in Terre Haute. Registration and hors d’oeuvres will begin at 5 p.m., and the program will begin at 6 p.m. Tickets for the event are $50 per ticket or $400 for a table of eight. A $500 Corporate Sponsorship that includes a table of eight is also available.

All funds raised at the Be the Change event through ticket sales and donations will benefit the Hamilton Center Foundation, and all funds will be generously matched, dollar-for-dollar, by the Hux Family Charitable Trust. To make a reservation or donation, visit www.hamiltoncenterfoundation.org, or call 812-231-8416.

The mission of the Hamilton Center Foundation is to strengthen the community by providing consistent and lasting support to Hamilton Center, Inc. (HCI) as it provides the highest quality behavioral health care and wellness services in Indiana. The Foundation has made several grants to support Hamilton Center programs, most recently providing approximately $18,000 in mini grants to support a variety of HCI initiatives, including providing safety products and materials for families, supporting a community-wide suicide prevention campaign, offering summer activities for underserved youth, providing emergency funds to support basic needs, purchasing hiking equipment to support an outdoor recreation therapy group, providing funds to purchase play therapy equipment for young children, and supporting graduation celebrations for individuals who complete treatment for substance use disorders. The Foundation also recently awarded $25,000 to Hamilton Center’s mentoring program, which matches at-risk youth with HCI staff mentors who work to help the children develop positive relationships and behavior at school and at home. The program offers tutoring options and seeks to build confidence among the students.

To learn more about the Hamilton Center Foundation, visit www.hamiltoncenterfoundation.org, or contact Margie Anshutz at manshutz@hamiltoncenter.org or 812-231-8320.

WIN Recovery Offers Help, Hope, and Healing

Terre Haute – “One hundred and ninety; that’s the number of lives lost to overdose every day in the United States,” said Natasha Newcomb, Executive Director of Addictions Services, Hamilton Center, Inc. “WIN Recovery works every day to lower that number, and we are here to show our support to those families most affected by it,” she added.

On August 30th, 2019, WIN Recovery, Hamilton Center’s certified opioid treatment program, gave community members an opportunity to recognize struggles of addiction and the many lives lost to overdose in our community. The event featured the release of 190 butterflies, symbolic of the 190 lives lost, in recognition of International Overdose Awareness Day, set for August 31, 2019. The organization also celebrated the kickoff to September as Recovery Month with a testimony of recovery and a message of hope from community members who have previously struggled with addiction.

In 2017 it was reported the U.S. experiences one of every four overdose deaths in the world, with an estimated 20 million people, five percent of the global adult population, in need of some form or substance use treatment. With opioids playing a huge role accounting for 70 percent of all global drug use disorders, WIN Recovery is doing its part to serve the local needs of community members and their loved ones struggling with addiction.

If you or someone you care about is struggling with an opioid use disorder, contact WIN Recovery at (812)-231-8484. Regain Something Lost.

Hamilton Center, Inc. is a regional behavioral health system in Central and West Central Indiana. Services are provided to adolescents and adults, with specialized programs for expectant mothers, infants, and people with drug and alcohol problems. Counseling services are provided for people who may be struggling with stress, life changes, or relationship issues as well as more serious problems such as depression, anxiety disorders, and serious mental illnesses.

WIN Recovery to Host Overdose Awareness Day

190 butterfly release for 190 lives lost to overdose every day.

Terre Haute –On August 30th, 2019 at 12:30 p.m. WIN Recovery invites those affected by addiction or overdose to 88 Wabash Court in Terre Haute, IN, behind the courthouse. The event will recognize International Overdose Awareness Day, which falls on Labor Day weekend, Saturday, August 31st, 2019. With the help of community members who have been effected by addiction or lost loved ones to overdose, 190 butterflies will be released in recognition of the 190 people who lose their lives to overdose every day in the U.S. In addition, the event will feature a guest speaker who will share their own personal journey, and a message of hope and recovery. The butterfly release will begin at 1:00 PM; refreshments and tours of the WIN Recovery, Hamilton Center’s certified opioid treatment program, will also be available.
For additional information, call Zach Jenkins, Public Relations Specialist, at 812-231-8118.
Hamilton Center, Inc. is a regional behavioral health system in Central and West Central Indiana. Services are provided to adolescents and adults, with specialized programs for expectant mothers, infants, and people with drug and alcohol problems. Counseling services are provided for people who may be struggling with stress, life changes, or relationship issues as well as more serious problems such as depression, anxiety disorders, and serious mental illnesses.

Hamilton Center Awarded DMHA Systems of Care Grant

Sets date for next SOC meeting.

Terre Haute, IN- Hamilton Center has been awarded the School Based Systems of Care grant by the Department of Mental Health and Addictions (DMHA). The grant provides $7,672 to strengthen the relationship between the SOC, the community, and local schools. Funds will be used to purchase marketing items specific to Vigo County’s Systems of Care and create a SOC website open to the public, giving children and families additional access to available resources.

This month’s SOC meeting took place on August, 20 2019 at Sarah Scott Middle School. As always community members, specifically those involved in the “system of care”, were invited to attend and share their thoughts and experiences. This communication promotes cultural competency and affords the members of the SOC an opportunity to assess the system for gaps in services.

The next meeting will be held on September 17 at 3:30 p.m. at Valley Health Professionals, located at 1530 N 7th St. in Terre Haute, IN.

“Hamilton Center’s primary goals in seeking this grant were to decrease mental health stigma within the schools, strengthen referral pathways from schools to the SOC, and cultivate linkages between schools and mental health providers in the community” said Dwight Weaver, Grant Coordinator, and Wraparound Coordinator at Hamilton Center, Inc. “By attacking these three areas we can begin to address the gaps in services some families experience,” he added.

Systems of Care (SOC) is a network of community resources for youth and their families. Organizations, agencies, and groups meet once a month at varying locations with the purpose of collaborating on the issues of familial, social, economic, and behavioral health needs in the community. Organizations involved in an SOC work together to connect those in need to service providers, decrease barriers to treatment, and help families navigate the “system of care”., By incorporating a broad array of services and supports into a coordinated effort, the SOC creates meaningful community partnerships, promotes the highest standards of care, and seeks to improve the lives of youth and families.
If you are interested in attending the monthly meetings you can find more information about times and locations on Facebook at @Vigo Co System of Care or call Dwight Weaver, Wraparound Coordinator, Hamilton Center, Inc., at 812-231-8194.

Opioid Addiction & Pregnancy

Contributed by: Jessica Nevil, LMHC, Clinical Director at WIN Recovery, and Zach Jenkins, Public Relations Specialist at Hamilton Center, Inc.

Here’s what you need to know.

Opioid addiction during pregnancy is treatable and here’s what you need to know.

First, addiction to opioids can happen to anyone at any point in life. The fact is addiction of any kind is a physical and behavioral disorder and should be recognized as such. The act of seeking help takes great courage, and is one that requires fostering support; without a strong system of support the likelihood of treatment and recovery dramatically decreases.

Opioid drug use, and certainly drug abuse, can cause significant health risks to an unborn child, however, abruptly stopping the use of opioids can also be dangerous, even life threatening.

When a pregnant women uses an opioid her baby is exposed to the drug as well as the “highs and lows” of chronic use, including dependency and withdrawal. There is a common misconception that babies are born addicted to a substance, which is incorrect and misleading. Addiction is a physical, mental, and emotional cycle of behaviors that effects an individual often times over the span of a lifetime. Babies born during addiction are not guaranteed to experience addiction later in life; other environmental variables lead to this.

When consuming high doses of opioids the risks of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) greatly increases. NAS is a condition that requires medical attention for the symptoms of withdrawal and often appears as rapid shaking or sucking of the fists. These symptoms are managed through breast feeding, strengthening of the mother-child bond, and medical treatment.

With the opioid epidemic sweeping the country many federal, state, and local funds have been granted to community health centers across the state to develop opioid treatment programs (OTP). Indiana has opened nearly 20 opioid treatment programs in areas of the state hardest hit by the opioid issue. These programs offer medication assisted treatment (MAT) in several forms including buprenorphine, vivitrol, and methadone, some of which are coupled with comprehensive behavioral health services. Many programs are working closely with local hospitals to connect pregnant women to treatment. The collaboration of medical and behavioral health services found in opioid treatment programs is recognized as the most effective form of treatment when compared to abstinence or other programming options.

So what is the best drug option?

Today methadone is used as the gold standard for treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD) for most populations, including pregnant women. Used only for the treatment of opioid related addictions methadone is administered in daily dosing with mandatory addiction counseling. With the primary goal of harm reduction pregnant mothers will experience decreased risk of transmittable diseases including HIV, AIDS, and Hepatitis-C, decreased risk of overdose, and increased employability and social engagement.

If you are struggling with opioid use disorder during or after pregnancy it is important for you to seek medical help and have open and honest communication with your provider about past, current, and future drug use. Continued use will increase health risks for both you and your baby. WIN Recovery, the first OTP of its kind in the area, offers medication assisted treatment in the form of methadone, coupled with individual and group counseling, and case management. For more information about opioid use disorder, treatment, and recovery please contact 1-812-231-8484 or visit www.winrecovery.org.

www.drugabuse.gov
www.samhsa.org

“The opioid epidemic is impacting more than just the lives of those struggling with addiction”

Co-authored by: Anastasia Godsey, M.S. LMHC, Director of Child and Adolescent Services and HCI West at Hamilton Center, Inc. and Zach Jenkins, Public Relation Specialist, Hamilton Center, Inc.

With 52 percent of children removed from a home due to parental substance abuse and 51 percent of displaced children living with a relative who may struggle to support them, issues, like the opioid epidemic, are impacting more than just the lives of those struggling with addiction.

For children and youth being separated from family and familiar surroundings can be traumatizing. Separations that are sudden, unexpected, or prolonged can interfere with a child’s ability to develop healthy coping strategies, putting them at increased risk of social and behavioral issues later in life. Unfortunately, children are impacted by both witnessing the parental substance use as well as their parent’s decreased ability to provide for their needs due to their altered state of being. Children who witness parental substance use are put at higher risk for future substance abuse which can lead to multigenerational cycles of addiction.

In the event of child displacement as a result of abuse or neglect, a child is placed with a family member, often referred to as kinship care. These types of displacements are typically categorized as informal, formal, and voluntary. Child welfare services are involved in both formal and voluntary kinship care. In these arrangements many cite more access to services but less overall flexibility. Informal kinship care is the most common form of child displacement, with grandparents most commonly receiving placement of the child without involvement of child welfare services.

Recent data suggests grandparents, as kinship care givers, may face additional emotional and financial challenges that other care givers involved with child welfare services do not. Of grandparents who are responsible for their grandchildren 41 percent are older than 60 years of age, 43 percent received Supplemental Security Income, public assistance income, or Food Stamps/SNAP Benefits, and 22 percent live in poverty. All of these factors contribute to financial burdens most commonly associated with receiving custody of a child. Furthermore, the majority of grandparents receiving placement of a child are not licensed in the foster care system and therefore may not be eligible for the same services and financial support as licensed foster parents, further complicating the issue.

The good news is that there are ways to break the cycles of multi-generational addiction. Kinship care promotes family bonds, stability, as well as a sense of belonging for children, all of which are considered risk factors when absent during a child’s earliest years of growth and development. Utilizing community resources for parental support and trauma related to parental substance use as well as seeking treatment for the child/children involved can minimize the risks associated with childhood displacement.
Hamilton Center, Inc. is a regional behavioral health system serving central and west central Indiana. The organization is “building hope and changing lives” through a broad array of behavioral health services for adults, children, adolescents, and families. Services are individualized, trauma informed, and evidence-based. Needs and strengths are assessed and utilized to develop a person-centered treatment plan.

Hamilton Center provides Infant and Toddler Services programs especially designed for children from birth until three years of age and their families. These services include: Healthy Families and Early Head Start. Admission criteria is different for each program, but all services are free of charge to families. Infant and Toddler Services’ programs are operated by Hamilton Center, Inc., a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) corporation. Both programs are offered in Vigo County; the Healthy Families program is also offered in Greene County, Sullivan County, and Vermillion County.

Hamilton Center also offers treatment services for adults and children who are impacted by trauma including: individual, crisis, family, school based therapy, and group therapy. Hamilton Center also offers skills training, case management, and wraparound services in the community and home as an opportunity to meet the needs of the consumers in multiple areas of their lives. Hamilton Center is currently a DMHA grantee for the Transition Aged Youth Grant which provides funding for ages 14-26. This grant focuses on helping individuals in being able to successfully navigate into early adulthood.